Today in Madonna History: January 6, 1996

On January 6 1996, You’ll See peaked at #10 on Billboard’s Latin Pop Airplay chart in the U.S.

With the help of the single’s Spanish version, Verás, the song would also reach #21 in Billboard’s Hot Latin Tracks chart several weeks later, on January 20th.

Today in Madonna History: December 16, 1995

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On December 16 1995, Madonna’s You’ll See hit #6 in the USA.

When You’ll See peaked at number six on the Billboard Hot 100, it made Madonna one of only three artists in the Hot 100 history to have a hit peak at each position from one to ten on the chart. 

Today in Madonna History: December 2, 1995

On December 2 1995, Madonna appeared on the cover of NME (New Music Express) magazine. The cover/interview was part of the Something To Remember promotional plan.

Here are a few questions from the interview:

Is ‘You’ll See’ about revenge?

“No, It’s about empowering yourself. As much as I like a song like ‘Take A Bow’, lyrically it only reflects one side of my personality. I have that side which in completely masochistic and willing to, literally, do anything for love. But there’s another side too which is – ‘Don’t f*** with me, I don’t need anybody. I can do what I want’ and ‘You’ll See’ reflects that.”

Are you getting harder as you get older?

“No, just wiser. I’ve read a couple of reviews that say I’m getting harder in my old age but I don’t think that’s true at all. I think that you can’t help but become a little cynical about life and love but I’m still a romantic, I’m still an idealist. I fall in love quite easily so I don’t think I’ve gotten harder at all. It’s just another thing for people to mention when they want to undermine who I am and what I say. Some people have a really hard time resisting thinking in a one-dimensional way in general.”

For a woman whose first hit was a song about holidays, Madonna implies that she is singularly bad at taking them.

“I despise anyone who looks at me and my lifestyle and thinks – ‘Oh God! Her life is so easy!’ Like I was born into it and it happened overnight. Bullshit! I work so f**ing hard.”

Nor is she deluded about her commercial ranking. Though still one of the most famous women in the world – most people have forgotten more about Madonna than they achieve in their entire lives – her record sales don’t always reflect this.

“I’ve gone from having a huge fan base to losing a huge fan base to having a kind of fluctuating fan base. I’ve always had a core of fans who’ve stuck by me but, depending on the kind of music I do, I end up appealing to certain groups of people and alienating others.”

Does this bother you?

“No. I may not be as popular as I once was but people are starting to pay attention to my music and respect me as an artist more.”

Have you lost your nerve at any point over the years?

“Absolutely!” she laughs. “I panic every time I put out a record. I think every artist does. Every time you have a Number One record you think., ‘Well that was great but I’ll probably never be able to do it again’. It’s never-ending.”

Today in Madonna History: May 6, 1996

On May 6 1996, dance remixes of Love Don’t Live Here Anymore by Markus Schulz & C.L. McSpadden were released to clubs by Maverick Records on promotional twelve-inch vinyl & CD in the U.S.

Additional club remixes of the track by Mark Picchiotti were also issued in the U.K. as a twelve-inch white-label promo.

Today in Madonna History: March 4, 1996

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On March 4 1996, Madonna’s Love Don’t Live Here Anymore music video was shot at the Confitería El Molino in Buenos Aires, Argentina, during her day off from filming Evita.

The music video was directed by Jean-Baptiste Mondino, who worked with Madonna on her videos for Open Your Heart, Justify My Love and Human Nature.

Love Don’t Live Here Anymore was released as the fourth single from the Something to Remember ballads collection.

In her Evita diaries, published by Vanity Fair magazine in 1996, Madonna made reference to the video shoot:

“There are no words to describe the weariness I feel today. I have not slept well in days, and when I do, there is no comfort. My dreams are violent and full of betrayal. Like my life, there’s no escape. I feel the responsibility of this film. I cannot talk about Evita and her life without defending myself … Dear God, what have I gotten myself into? What is happening to me? Today we went to shoot a music video for my next song. But I kept forgetting the lyrics, and felt like crying each and every time I did it. It was so frustrating. It’s my own song!”


Today in Madonna History: January 20, 1996

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On January 20 1996, Madonna’s You’ll See re-entered the Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 at #10.

The lead single from Madonna’s Something To Remember ballads collection debuted at #8 on December 8, peaked at #6 on December 16, and in the following weeks fell to #9, #11, #12, #11 and then climbed back to #10.

Larry Flick had this to say about You’ll See:

Foster’s flair for musical melodrama inspires Madonna to turn in what is easily her most assured and full-bodied vocal performance to date. Amid a swirl of strings and Spanish guitars, she spews the song’s declaration of romantic independence with a theatrical verve that perfectly matches the stagey, potentially overpowering tone of Foster’s arrangement without flying over the heads of her youthful top 40 following. A stunning effort that could easily become the ‘I Will Survive’ of this generation.


Today in Madonna History: December 24, 1995


On December 24 1995, Oh Father was released as the second UK single from Madonna’s ballads retrospective, Something To Remember.

Warner had initially declined the option to release Oh Father in most European markets when it became the fourth North American single from Like A Prayer in late 1989, instead opting for a more by-the-numbers portrait of childhood innocence with the release of Dear Jessie. Why it was determined to be a better idea in 1995, following its poor showing on the U.S. charts, is anyone’s guess. One possibility is that Oh Father‘s brilliant preexisting music video provided an easy, cost-free means of promoting the song while Madonna remained unavailable due to her recording commitments for the Evita soundtrack.

While I would personally rank Oh Father among Madonna’s very best musical and lyrical efforts, and its music video an underrated classic – it never had the makings of a commercial hit. And history repeated itself when the song’s dark subject matter once again stunted its ability to gain momentum on radio for its British release. It became only her third UK single at the time to peak outside the top-ten when it stalled at #16 in its first charting week. It fared better in Finland and Italy, however, reaching #6 in both countries.

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