Today in Madonna History: June 21, 2019

On June 21 2019, Madonna’s Medellín reached #1 on Billboard’s Dance Club Play chart for the issue dated June 29.

The upbeat gem of a summer song featuring Maluma is Madonna’s 47th No. 1 hit on the Dance Club Play chart. Woo!

Here is a list of Madonna’s 47 number one Dance hits so far (June 2019):

1983 – Holiday/Lucky Star
1984 – Like A Virgin
1985 – Material Girl
1985 – Angel/Into the Groove
1987 – Open Your Heart
1987 – Causing a Commotion (Remix)
1988 – You Can Dance (LP Cuts)
1989 – Like A Prayer
1989 – Express Yourself
1990 – Keep It Together
1990 – Vogue
1991 – Justify My Love
1992 – Erotica
1993 – Deeper and Deeper
1993 – Fever
1994 – Secret
1995 – Bedtime Story
1997 – Don’t Cry for Me Argentina
1998 – Frozen
1998 – Ray of Light
1999 – Nothing Really Matters
1999 – Beautiful Stranger
2000 – American Pie
2000 – Music
2001 – Don’t Tell Me
2001 – What It Feels Like for a Girl
2001 – Impressive Instant
2002 – Die Another Day
2003 – American Life
2003 – Hollywood
2003 – Me Against the Music – Britney Spears featuring Madonna
2004 – Nothing Fails
2004 – Love Profusion
2005 – Hung Up
2006 – Sorry
2006 – Get Together
2006 – Jump
2008 – 4 Minutes
2008 – Give It 2 Me
2009 – Celebration
2012 – Give Me All Your Luvin’
2012 – Girl Gone Wild
2012 – Turn Up the Radio
2015 – Living for Love
2015 – Ghosttown
2015 – Bitch I’m Madonna
2019 – Medellín

Today in Madonna History: May 3, 2019

On May 3 2019, British Vogue revealed that Madonna would be gracing their June cover, with photos by Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott.

Vogue also published a fantastic article about Madonna’s fight against ageism:

Is The Fight Against Ageism Madonna’s Biggest Revolution Ever?

With her new album Madame X, out June 14th, Madonna stages another reinvention in her revolutionary career. But in a new era of self-expression, individual freedom and all-encompassing diversity, it’s perplexing that her age remains her biggest barrier, argues Anders Christian Madsen.

The morning after Madonna’s red-blooded performance at the Billboard Awards on Wednesday evening, entertainment websites quoted the court of Twitter. It was the same old story: granny emojis, ageist slurs and chauvinist memes. At the release of Madame X, her fourteenth studio album, 60-year-old rebel Madonna is still facing the toughest of all her revolutions: making the world accept that women at sixty can create, perform and make an impact with the same freedom of expression as a thirty-year-old. Regardless of her artistic merit, age and ageism have formed the background noise to every album Madonna has released since she turned fifty; perhaps even forty. What seems to be society’s issue with her is that she refuses to abide by the unwritten rules of age pertaining to everything from behaviour to dress codes and humour. The implication is that Madonna is in denial of her age; that she wants to trick us into thinking she’s young. The nerve!

Yet, on the contrary, Madonna’s music and performances in recent years have owned and celebrated her age and legacy, from the way she proudly references every reinvention of her career on her every tour, to her nostalgically reflective lyrics and samples of her own evergreens on her last album Rebel Heart, and her new single Medellín, which opens with verses that entirely embrace where she’s at in life: “I took a pill and had a dream, I went back to my seventeenth year. Allowed myself to be naïve, to be someone I’ve never been.” At sixty, Madonna is anything but old news. Medellín, a duet with Maluma, is the most experimental work she’s written since Ray of Light: a multi-layered, mostly Spanish-language song that breaks all the conventions of pop music, yet echoes in your ear like the catchiest of Generation Z radio hits. So why is BBC’s Radio 1 – home to all the pop stars for whom Madonna paved the way – not adding Medellín to its playlist?

Their actions echo the statement made by the station’s head of music, George Ergatoudis, when Madonna released Rebel Heart in 2015: “The BBC Trust have asked us to go after a young audience. We’ve got to concentrate on [people aged] fifteen to thirty. We have to bring our average age down. That’s something we’re very conscious of. The vast majority of people who like Madonna, who like her music now, are over thirty and frankly, we’ve moved on from Madonna.” It was a sad message to stand by in a time when all the things Madonna has spent her life fighting for finally seem to be materialising in our shared mentality. Madame X is the first album Madonna has released since Time’s Up changed the world in 2017. Those waves made a lot of the causes she has worked for throughout her career come true. But they also brought with them a heightened sense of the witch-hunts Madonna has been subjected to since she hit the scene in the 1980s.

Her fearless tackling of sex as a topic in the public forum, refusal of sexual and gender-specific categorisation, and inexhaustible fight against racism, sexism, homophobia, religious suppression and ageism in the post-modern world should have made her the most celebrated pop star alive. And yet, by denying Madonna the same platform to promote her music as Rihanna, Beyoncé and Ariana Grande, we seem to forget the invaluable part she has played in creating the culture of individuality and diversity so attributed to the new generations. The destruction of icons has never been more practised than in this moment in time. There’s no knowing when the next accusations will hit the people you admire most, dead or alive, and tarnish their legacies with the indefinite effect that deems public defence temporarily unadvisable.

It’s why the opening scene in Madonna’s video for Medellín is so pertinent. “How could I trust anyone after years of disappointment and betrayal? How could I not want to run away?” she asks, confiding in her god the way she’s done it publicly so many times in her career. “I will never be what society expects me to be. I have been kidnapped, tortured, humiliated and abused. In the end I still have hope. I still believe in the goodness of humans.” Cynics will say her words are self-pitying and conceited, but for those of us to whom Madonna has served as an inspiration, an educator and a revolutionary for three or four decades, her prayer is as haunting as it is relevant. After all, it’s hard to think of a living person with a continuous platform as big as hers, who has persistently used it to inspire and improve the world around her. The provocative nature of Madonna’s behaviour is a very small part of her total sum as a freedom fighter.

But perhaps she’s met her match in what we all fear more than the battles she won in the past, which revolved around sexual and cultural differences and views different to our own. Age is the threat that hits us all, a fact that explains the existence of ageism. It’s why it’s such a towering barrier to climb, even for Madonna and her age-defying racehorse physique. But shouldn’t the #MeToo era, with all its morals and ethics, inevitably result in a better climate for a woman like Madonna? At the end of the day, she’s putting her 60-year-old, scanty-clad ass on the line for future generations to experience less societal limits than she did once she passed the 40-year mark. Rather than pointing out her age, every person on social media – young or old – should be celebrating it, thanking Madonna for continuously going where no one else dares to go. Because while all of Madonna’s revolutions have gained her attention, it’s nothing compared to what she’s done for the rest of us.

Today in Madonna History: May 2, 2019

On May 2 2019, Hello Magazine published a glowing review of Madonna & Maluma’s live performance of Medellin at the Billboard Music Awards (which aired on May 1).

Here’s a snippet of the review:

Madonna made a comeback like no other on Wednesday night as she broke boundaries once again on stage at the Billboard Music Awards. The American pop sensation took to the stage as she performed her new single Medellin with singer Maluma. Halfway into the performance, the pair were joined by four life-like holograms of Madonna, which appeared alongside them before quickly vanishing in puffs of smoke. Each hologram was wearing one of the costumes Madonna modelled in the music video for Medellin, and appeared again later in the performance, continuing to dance alone on the stage as Madonna and Maluma made their way into the crowds. The holograms were created by world-leading volumetric and 3D capture studio Dimension.

This was Madonna’s first performance at the Billboard Music Awards in over four years, and Maluma was only too happy to be sharing the stage with her. This was the Colombian star’s first-ever performance at the prestigious awards, and told E! on the red carpet how their collaboration came about. He said: “It was crazy, I went to the VMAs. I met her [Madonna] over there, then I was touring in Europe and in London she called me and she said she had a song for me called Medellín. I’m from Medellín, Columbia and it’s crazy that she said that she wanted me to be part of the project.” Madonna was just as happy to perform with Maluma, and said after the performance: “Madame X on stage performing with her favourite Papi – thank you @maluma.”

Today in Madonna History: April 24, 2019

On April 24 2019, Madonna’s music video for Medellín, featuring Maluma, premiered during an MTV special. The music video was directed by Diana Kunst and Mao Morco.

During the intro to the video, Madonna whispers:

“I will never be what society expects me to be. I have seen too much… I cannot turn back. I have been kidnapped, tortured, humiliated and abused. But I still have hope. I still believe in the goodness of humans. Thank god for nature. For the angels that surround me. For the spirit of my mother, who is always protecting. From now on, I am Madame X. And Madame X loves to dance… Because you cannot hit a moving target.”

Today in Madonna History: April 19, 2019

On April 19 2019, Billboard announced that Madonna and Maluma would perform Medellín at the 2019 Billboard Music Awards:

Madonna and Maluma are bringing the worldwide television debut performance of their single Medellín to the 2019 Billboard Music Awards. The appearance, announced on Friday (April 19), will be Madonna’s first performance of new music on TV in more than four years. The pair will take the stage on May 1 at the Kelly Clarkson-hosted show, which will air on NBC at 8 p.m. ET/PT.

The first taste of Madonna’s upcoming 14th studio album, Madame X (June 14), is a mid-tempo Spanish pop burner that finds the pair flirting over a skittering cha-cha beat, with Maluma telling the pop superstar, “Excuse me, I know you are Madonna/ But I’m going to show you how this perro (dog) will make you fall in love.” Madonna last performed at the BBMA’s in 2016 during a tribute to Prince.

They join a previously announced group of performers at this year’s show, which include: the Jonas Brothers, BTS with Halsey, Kelly Clarkson, Lauren Daigle, Khalid, Panic! at the Disco and Sam Smith and Normani. The show from the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas will also feature a special performance from 2019 ICON Award recipient Mariah Carey.

Today in Madonna History: April 18, 2019

On April 18 2019, PopSugar published a review of Madonna’s Medellín featuring Maluma (review by Victoria Messina):

Madonna and Maluma Dropped a Spanglish Collab We’ll Have on Repeat All Summer Long

World, meet Madame X, a persona created by Madonna for her upcoming 14th studio album. The alter ego made her grand debut on Wednesday when the 60-year-old pop star dropped a collaborative single titled Medellín, featuring 25-year-old Colombian singer Maluma. The summery bop, which is Madonna’s first new single since 2015, combines both English and Spanish lyrics with easy-going Reggaeton beats as the two artists reflect on their pasts and imagine a trip to the Colombian city where Maluma was born. Madonna opens the song by singing, “I took a pill and had a dream. I went back to my 17th year. Allowed myself to be naïve . . . to be someone I’ve never been. I took a sip and had a dream . . . And I woke up in Medellín.”

Madonna and Maluma may seem like a random pairing at first, but the two actually met backstage at the 2018 MTV VMAs, where they hit it off and planned to team up on music afterward. Madonna’s entire Madame X album will debut on June 14, and the Medellín music video will be released on April 24. Watch a sneak peek clip below to catch an intriguing glimpse at Madonna — er, Madame X — and Maluma cha cha-ing to the beat for the video.

Today in Madonna History: April 17, 2019

On April 17 2019, Madonna issued the press release for her forthcoming album, Madame X:

MADONNA TO RELEASE HIGHLY-ANTICIPATED 14th STUDIO ALBUM MADAME X GLOBALLY ON JUNE 14th

FIRST TRACK MEDELLÍN WITH MALUMA IS ZANE LOWE’S WORLD RECORD ON BEATS1 TODAY

MTV PRESENTS MADONNA LIVE & EXCLUSIVE: MEDELLÍN VIDEO WORLD PREMIERE ON APRIL 24

PRE-ORDER MADAME X NOW: ALBUM PRE-ORDERS INCLUDE DOWNLOAD OF MEDELLÍN

Madonna’s highly-anticipated 14th studio album Madame X will be released on June 14th globally from Live Nation, Interscope Records and Maverick. The first track from the album Medellín, with Colombian superstar Maluma, will be Zane Lowe’s World Record today on Apple Music’s Beats 1. Madame X is now available for pre-order. Album pre-orders include a download of the first track which is available across Apple, Spotify (pre-save), Amazon and all DSPs. Select additional tracks will become available before the album release.

Madonna will exclusively unveil the world premiere of her video and single Medellín with Maluma, during a globally televised MTV music event, MTV Presents Madonna Live & Exclusive: Medellín Video World Premiere, on Wednesday, April 24 at 9:00 pm BST / 4:00pm ET/ 1:00pm PT. Madonna will join British DJ Trevor Nelson and fans live from London for a conversation about the influences of her new album, and the creative forces behind her transcendent career. Medellín collaborator and Colombian pop star Maluma will join live from Miami. Madonna will also take questions during the global event via satellite from MTV’s Sway Calloway and fans in New York City, with additional MTV-hosted events in Milan and São Paulo.

Influenced creatively by living in Lisbon, Portugal over the past several years, Madame X is a collection of 15 new songs that celebrate Madonna’s career-long affair with Latin music and culture as well as other global influences. Singing in Portuguese, Spanish and English, highlights on the album include Medellín, which was co-produced by Mirwais and captures the spirit of Maluma’s hometown, the anthemic song I Rise, the Jamaican dancehall vibes of Future featuring Quavo, and co-produced by Diplo, as well as the sonically innovative Mirwais produced Dark Ballet. Recorded over 18 months in Portugal, London, New York and Los Angeles, Madonna collaborated on Madame X with longtime producer Mirwais, as well as with producers Mike Dean and Diplo, among others.

“Lisbon is where my record was born,” Madonna says. “I found my tribe there and a magical world of incredible musicians that reinforced my belief that music across the world is truly all connected and is the soul of the universe.”

Madame X will come in a standard and deluxe version of the album. A Target CD version will feature the deluxe version of Madame X plus an additional two tracks. Pre-order the Target deluxe at Target stores or online at Target.com. A variety of special bundles of Madame X with one-of-a-kind limited merchandise, as well as special vinyl and cassette versions of the album, are available now for pre-order as well HERE. Further details regarding the album, videos and appearances will be announced in the coming weeks.

This is the cover for the standard CD version:

The full track listing for Madame X CD standard version (pre-order):

  1. Medellín with Maluma
  2. Dark Ballet
  3. God Control
  4. Future ft. Quavo
  5. Batuka
  6. Killers Who Are Partying
  7. Crave ft. Swae Lee
  8. Crazy
  9. Come Alive
  10. Faz Gostoso ft. Anitta
  11. Bitch I’m Loca ft. Maluma
  12. I Don’t Search I Find
  13. I Rise

The double black vinyl version (pre-order), web-exclusive double clear vinyl version (pre-order), cassette version and digital deluxe version all contain the following 15-tracks (see below for the digital deluxe cover):

  1. Medellín with Maluma
  2. Dark Ballet
  3. God Control
  4. Future ft. Quavo
  5. Batuka
  6. Killers Who Are Partying
  7. Crave ft. Swae Lee
  8. Crazy
  9. Come Alive
  10. Faz Gostoso ft. Anitta
  11. Bitch I’m Loca ft. Maluma
  12. I Don’t Search I Find
  13. I Rise
  14. Looking for Mercy
  15. I Rise

This is the cover for the digital deluxe and FNAC exclusive double-CD versions:

This is the cover for the cassette version:

This is the cover for the deluxe 2-CD version with additional 3-bonus tracks:

The 3 tracks on the bonus CD are:

  1. Fuana
  2. Back That Up To The Beat
  3. Ciao Bella

And finally, the Madame X box set:

The Madame X box set includes:

  • Deluxe CD (15 tracks + 3 bonus tracks + 32-page book)
  • Double poster
  • 7″ picture disc for I Rise
  • Cassette (standard version with 13 tracks)
  • Temporary tattoos

Jay’s Note: Please forgive me if I’ve confused any of these versions. I’ll update if I notice any mistakes .. there are a LOT of versions to keep track of!

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