Today in Madonna History: July 29, 2012

On July 29 2012, Madonna issued this statement about the controversy surround her mini-MDNA Tour performance at the L’Olympia in Paris on July 26:

“Playing the Olympia was a magical moment for me and it was a real treat to do this special show for my fans and be so close to them. Unfortunately at the end of the show – after I left the stage – a few thugs who were not my fans rushed the stage and started throwing plastic bottles pretending to be angry fans. The press reports have focused on this and not the joyous aspect of the evening. But nothing can take away or ruin this very special evening for me and my fans. When I looked out in the audience, everyone I saw had a smile on their face. I look forward to having this wonderful experience again.”

Watch this exclusive Olympia performance of Beautiful Killer (mixed with Die Another Day):

Thanks to YouTube user Madonna Madders

Today in Madonna History: July 10, 1985

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Madonna I'm Not Ashamed

On July 10 1985, The Playboy magazine issue of nude Madonna photos was released.

Today in Madonna History: May 19, 2019

On May 19 2019, Madonna was scolded in the international press for “making a political statement” during her performance at the Eurovision Song Contest held the previous day, which ended with performers wearing Israeli and Palestinian flags on their backs with arms interlocked in embrace and the words “wake up” appearing on a stage screens.

Madonna’s camp responded with what should be (but is apparently not) obvious: “A message of peace is not a political statement.”

Here is the common definition of the term political statement:

The term political statement is used to refer to any act or non-verbal form of communication that is intended to influence a decision to be made for or by a political party. A political statement can vary from a mass demonstration to the wearing of a badge with a political slogan.

How exactly Madonna’s performance constitutes a political statement in the eyes of the media is puzzling. She did not endorse the political advancement or agenda of either side; she simply reiterated her longstanding and widely expressed wish for a peaceful resolution to the conflict.

A more reasonable argument would be that had she not included this symbolic gesture in her performance, it may have been construed as muted political support for Israel’s position. By making the gesture she did, she instead reiterated her political neutrality and her wish for peace.

Equally telling was the network’s response that its desire was to broadcast an entertainment special that essentially whitewashed the realities of the conflict. Clearly, they would have us believe that ignoring the conflict is the acceptable, non-partisan stance, while acknowledging the conflict and expressing one’s hope for its peaceful resolution should be viewed as provocational or controversial.

The irony is that it is only those who are trying to frame Madonna’s actions as a political statement that are, in fact, making one.

Today in Madonna History: May 4, 2005

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On May 4 2005, a jealous Boy George lashed out at Madonna in the press for her ambitious nature:

“If Madonna were a drag queen, she would be called Ruth Less.

I don’t think the word ‘warm’ comes to mind with Madonna. Ice is the word that springs to mind.”

What drag queen name would you give Madonna? 

Today In Madonna History: February 18, 2001

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On February 18 2001, Madonna wrote a letter to the Los Angeles Times newspaper in defence of controversial rap artist Eminem over the public and media criticism of his offensive song lyrics and Grammy Award nominations:

“What is the big deal about Eminem? Since when is offensive language a reason for being unpopular? I find the language of George W. much more offensive. I find the hypocritical nature of most popular figures in our culture much more offensive. I like the fact that Eminem is brash and angry and politically incorrect. At least he has an opinion. He’s stirring things up, he’s provoking a discussion, he’s making people’s blood boil. He’s reflecting what’s going on in society right now. That is what art is supposed to do. And after all he’s just a boy. Thank God he’s rebellious and not well-groomed. He gets my vote. Yours truly, Mrs. Ritchie.”

Today in Madonna History: January 15, 1993

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On January 15 1993, Body of Evidence was released across North America. The erotic thriller was produced by Dino De Laurentiis and directed by Uli Edel.  The film starred Madonna and Willem Dafoe, with Joe Mantegna, Anne Archer, Julianne Moore and Jürgen Prochnow in supporting roles.

The theatrical release for the film received the rare NC-17 rating (“No Children Under 17 Admitted”).

Sex was a game to her. She got off on the control. She always used to tell me it had to be her way.

When was the last time you watched Body of Evidence? Thoughts?

Today in Madonna History: November 21, 1992

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On November 21 1992, Madonna’s SEX book was banned in Ireland (a month after it went on sale). The Censorship Board decided that any future shipments of the book should not be sold. Booksellers and fans voiced their opposition, but an appeal of the decision never occurred. Additional copies of the book were never made available, making the ban a silly waste of time.

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